About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
WETA 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 42
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> back tomorrow. >> letterman is next. ( band playing "late show" theme ) >> from new york, the greatest city in the world, it's the "late show" with david letterman. tonight...
. >> or a letterman show. >> something like that. >> i will tell you something that has changed enormously. when "nightline" began in march of 1980, you did not have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would rerun some old cop drama. but among the three programs, "the tonight show," the cop drama and "nightline," we had 70% of all the homes watching television at 11:30 at night. >> really? >> 70%. these days, "the tonight show," "nightline" and the letterman show are lucky to have 25%. that's what's happened because what you didn't have 35 years ago was cable, satellite, you know, the internet, and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the networks. >> so maybe twilight is too soft a word. >> no, because you still have -- i mean, even though it's only 25%, the evening news casts, for example. among the three of them, i suspect they still have between 15 and 20 million viewers every night. >> more than that, 20 to 25 million. >> 20 to 25 million. when you and i were reporting from the state department, it was 40 million, 50 million. cronkite alone probably had about 20
for me as a writer, along with david letterman and many others. louie anderson and a lot of other people. >> bill: where were you when he was writing for you. >> on our show in los angeles. >> bill: how did leno change. >> he changed in terms of bringing on new talent, which is that spot which is johnny carson, jack parr, steve allen. he has not broken in his 20 something years on the air, he has not broken one major act. >> bill: you know, it's a different time now andaj the ratings pressure i bs so intense. >> jay is numberre one. do whatever he wants. >> bon jovi ride in air force one with the president. that's pretty cool. joe biden, he had to drive up in a van with the guys who sang "who let the dogs out." >> you can tell me 10 minutes a weekho going to destroy your whole career, i'm not buying that all i say to jay leno is do whatin was done for you. that's all. and now jay used to come on every five to six weeks on the letterman show. i got him on the merv griffin show a billion times. that's what happened. it doesn't hurt you if you bring on the new guy because you want to see so
these things together, they go on "the view," they go on letterman, they get attacked for that. ut, in fact, that's the only way to reach folks. >> rose: and they believe it humanized them to do that. >> but they can not get -- it's very hard to exercise presidential leadership in the classic sense in a culture that is so incredibly atomized. >> i don't think i agree with that. so if you look at what's happened over i would say the last 30 or 40 years is power has become centralized in washington. in the white house each white house i've covered is more insular and centralized than the one before and it's a relatively small number of people in the west wing. in congress it's more centralized. in the house much more centralized in the speaker's office. in the senate much more centralized in the leadership. so i do think if you got say an obama and a boehner and a romney or a reid together with a relatively small number of people you could exercise serious presidential leadership even with all the other things going on in the country. >> tom and then jon. go ahead, tom. >> i'll just add to da
challenging to say the least for the journalists to keep up with "the david letterman show" petraeus soap opera. with him stepping down other his affair with biography paula broad well has led to a tangle. a shirtless fbi agent and another general and the media can't get enough. >> one of the officials describes the i'm as sexually explicit. >> apparently 20 to 30,000 pages of e-mails with jill kelley who set the fw bi on paula broad well. >> petraeus affair. >> biographer and mistress paula broadwell. >> schenn an begans. >> very explicit e-mails. >> friend employ, perhaps flirtatio flirtatious. >> is this story serious or just salacious. s that there been too much reckless speculation and has it overshadowed popp's agenda or the investigation of the investigation in ia reese role with benghazi. >> the consecutive executive steps down. can he jump-start a paper that's been through tough times? aisle ask him. a i'm howard kufrts and this is "reliable sources." >>> it is for the media the perfect storm when the combined sex, scandal, war, spying, and gossip, not to mention an fbi investiga
. the president in his interview with cbs the day following the attack on univision, on the dade letterman show and before united nations did not call it a terrorist attack. >> shannon: republican senator kelly ayotte. here is adam schiff on the house side and said anyone who was listening it was clear from general petraeus and other intelligence officials who testified last week that the talking points were amended to protect classified sources of information. not subject to political spin by the white house or ambassador to the u.n. the director of national intelligence said there were no sub stantive changes made after they left the committee. back with the panel. do you think the circumstance is tightping around who made substantive changes now? >> i think that the dni director clapper is going to have to explain, he now says he made them. or the intelligence community made them. he has to explain why he made them and why he said earlier they hadn't made them. but i think this will be explained. it's interesting because senator ayotte neglected to mention in the cbs interview later, clip ca
. the presidents don't get that anymore unless it's a real crises. so they go on the view, they go on letterman. they get a tax for that. butn fact, that's the only way to reach them. >> rose: they believe it humanizes them to do that. >> they do but they cannot get, it's very hard to exercise presidential leadership in the classic sense, in a culture that is so incredibly atomized. >> rose: david go ahead. >> i don't think i agree with that. if you look at what's happened over i would say over the last 30 or 40 years, this power has become centralized in washington. t's more insular and more centralized and a small number of people in the west wing that really control the administration. in congress it's certainly more centralized than the house, much more centralized than the speaker's office in the senate and much more centralized in the leadership. so i do think that if you got say obama and boehner or romney and reid together with a relatively small number of people, you could exercise some pretty serious presidential leadership even with all the other thing going on in the country we ta
't not have been born. >> you did not have the tonight show or the letterman show. >> i will tell you something that has changed enormously. when nightline began in march of 1980, you did not have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would be run some old and trauma, but among the three programs, but tonight show, the cop drama, and nightline we had 70% of homes watching television at 11:00 at night. these days they are lucky to have 25%. that is what happened because what you did not have 35 years ago was cable, satellite the internet, and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> maybe twilight is too soft. >> you still have evening newscasts. among the three of them, i suspect we have between 15 million and 20 million viewers. it was 50 million. cronkite alone probably have about 20 million people. >> that certainly is true. the responsibilities of journalism to democracy and to our society. i want you to talk about about a little bit more. i want you to explain why there is this connection between the flow of news and a vibrant society. >> if
or the letterman show, something like that. >> one of the things that is change in all this, when "nightline" began in march 1980, you had, you didn't have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would rerun some old cop drama, but among the three programs, the tonight show, the cop drama and "nightline," we had 70% of all the homes watching television at 11:30 p.m. 70%. these days, the tonight show, "nightline," and the letterman show are likely to have 25%. that's what's happened because what you didn't have 35 years ago was cable, satellite, you know, the internet. and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> so maybe twilight is too soft a word? [laughter] >> no. because you still have, even though it's only 25%, the evening newscasts, for example. among the three of them i suspect they still have between 15 and 20 million viewers every night. >> more than that. 20-25 million. >> when you and i were reporting from the state department, it was 40 million, 50 million. i mean, i think cronkhite alone probably had about 20 million people. >> every night. that cer
.to love dave letterman. income back to cbs "this you're i i'm nora o'donnell in new york. charlie rose, you're in my chair sitting rton. he i'm sitting right here. i feel the great not of the chair. >> >> miss you. >> i meiss you, and i'll be bac tomorrow. >>> there's a sense of unit here in washington because there's orientation for the newest members of congress. chip reid is out the capitol. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, and good morning to our viewers out west. earlier this morning the 80 or so new member of congress gathered on the capitol steps for their freshman class photo. they won't be sworn in until january, but they're here this week for a crash course on congress 101. the halls of the u.s. capitol hel a bit like high school this week, returning congressman strut with the confidence of >> r seniors. >> good morning. em reporter: newly elected embers seem like eager freshmen. >> on the scale of one to ten, one your? are you? >> a ten. it is exciting. >> reporter: there are nearly 80 ew members in the house including indiana's susan usanks. >> it has been a
david letterman. >>> an estimated 24 million americans will get on a plane this holiday weekend. >>> right now are you thinking of staying home from work? before you pick up that phone, here's dr. holly phillips. >> reporter: good morning. today on "health watch" when to call out sick. flu and cold season is here and inevitably some of us are going to wake up feeling lousy faced with the decision of whether to call out sick to work. here are some simple rules to when to pull up the covers. if you've got a fever, especially one over 102, accompanied by aches and pains, that could be a sign that you've got the flu. a sure choice for staying home. now, a milder fever with a sore throat and white patches on your tonsils suggests strep throat. in that case stay home and visit your doctor. you may need antibiotics. a mild cough, nasal congestion and low-grade fever may just be the common cold. if you feel up to it you can go into work but be kind to your co-workers and wash your hands before touching shared computers or appliances and cough into your elbow. researcher
the simplicity of the clinton years? >> got to love dave letterman. welcome back to cbs "this morning." i'm norah o'donnell in new york and charlie rose, hey you're in my chair in washington. >> i'm sitting right here. i feel the greatness of the chair. >> miss you. >> i miss you and i'll be back tomorrow. there's a sense of newness here in washington because it's or yerntsation week for the newest members of congress. chip reid is outside of the capitol. good morning. >> reporter: in just a few minutes the 80 or so wide eyed new members of the house of representatives will be gathering on the steps behind me for their efficiefreshman class. the halls of the u.s. capitol feel a bit like high school, returning congressmen struck with the confidence of seniors. >> good morning. >> reporter: while newly elected members seem like eager freshmen. >> on the appointment scale of one to ten where your? >> ten. it's exciting. >> reporter: there's 80 new members in the house including indiana's susan brooks. >> a lot of rules. a lot of discussion about, you know, the dose and don'ts. >> reporter: a lot of
think when you see clips like david letterman and denis leary talking about your product? what do you think when you see something like that? >> honestly, i think it comes back to the impact we're having and the fact that you look around anywhere in the world and people are using it. i was out last night and saw people using it in a restaurant. you go to tokyo, you see people using it in a bar. anywhere you go, instagram is there. >> and then you're on to the cover of "time" magazine. so major news events like hurricane sandy and "time" magazine. is that your expectation, kevin? >> the expectation, at least early on, was that we would try to have that amount of impact. but to see hurricane sandy photos come in and realize that people are documenting a world event that everyone's going to look back on in 20 years and realize that instagram was at the center of this world event. >> you had ten instagram photos per second with hurricane sandy. the election, too, record number of photographs taken. there's a kind of journalism in some ways that goes along i think with social media. we've
and say what you want about obama, he was on letterman, he was on leno. he was on "the view." he was on everything. and he should have done that. the ads were bad and don't forget at the beginning he started saying what a nice man our president is, how he's such a nice man. i think he stopped that at the end when he was getting hammered. it was very sad. >> gretchen: you think it was more the candidate rather than the party? >> well, i think a lot of things were bad. $400 million was spent on ads, you hear all about the pacs and some of them were the worst were i've ever seen. they did one where obama was a super hero. and they thought it was bad: i thought it was an obama ad. i thought, what great ad. then it was done bay friend of yours -- by a friend of yours. it was a republican ad. i thought it was a democrat ad. and they had many ads that were better. it was a mess. there was no way the republican should have lost. in a million years, they should not have lost with unemployment, with the country at a mess, with benghazi, with a scandal at the c.i.a. which turned out to be
letterman show" petraeus scandal. we'll have the latest developments, and there is a lot of them, in just a moment, to the tune of 30,000. >>> also this half hour, tensions flare in the middle east, israel reporting direct hits on syrian targets as syria's violence spills across more borders. >> yes, indeed. >>> also ahead, there's word from france this year's champagne harvest is the worst in 40 years. uh-oh, bad news for the french economy and bubbly lovers everywhere. heartbreaking news with new year's a few weeks away. people like a little bubbly on the 31st. do you like champagne? >> oui, oui-oui. >> oui-oui? [ speaking french ] i like some champagne. >> impressed. paula, very nice. au revoir. >> that's the extent of it. [ speaking french ] >> means shut your mouth, please. >> i'll be quiet. >> i should tell that to myself. >>> and then it's that time of year, fall fix-up and clean-up. we're going to have some of the best gadgets to help you get the job done. >> what job would that be? >> cleaning up. >> we begin with the major development in the unfolding scandal surrounding david p
and nicolas cage to a civil war era photograph on letterman. and then there was the time a group called improv everywhere brought a look along from king phillip iv of spain from the new york metropolitan museum and placed in front of the king from 1624. >> we're having an autograph signing with king phillip iv of spain. >> is he really a king? >> yeah. >> really? >> he's too young -- >> he's 400 years old. >> he doesn't look -- >> security asked them to leave. max would like to come back to the philadelphia museum of art in costume for a photo op. there is some sort of weird symmetry between those red tights and that purple tie dyed t-shirt. >> they would be great together. >> actually, some jokers already photo shopped them together. pink floyd t-shirt and tights. being venus might be safer. at least if your art twin is naked, no one can make fun of your fashion. nikki and max are asking if anyone has a nobleman's costume to len
that. if you recall, the president went not only on letterman, univision, the day after the cbs interview and 14 days later before the united nations, he did not call it a terrorist attack, nor did he reference it as connected to al-qaeda or an al-qaeda affiliated group. in fact, the only reference he made to al-qaeda in that u.n. speech to the world was that al-qaeda had been weakened and osama bin laden was dead. so i think this raises additional questions. it goes beyond ambassador rice. first of all, why were the talking points changed? it doesn't make any sense to me that we were trying to dupe al-qaeda that. doesn't pass the laugh test. buff also why was the president out 14 days later and still fail to go call it a terrorist attack to the world? >> steve: absolutely. because we don't know a lot of what is told by the intelligence community to the president of the united states, but we understand that 72 hours after the attack the presidential daily briefing, which tells the president about all the stuff that's going on, and it's classified, said just that. it wasn't spont
%. these days the tonight show, nightline and the letterman show are lucky to have 25%. that's what's happened because when you didn't have to be five years ago was cable, satellite, the internet and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> semidey twilight is too soft to work. [laughter] know because you still have even though it is only 25% the evening newscast for example. among the three of them i suspect they still had between 15 to 20 million viewers. >> 20, 25 million to be a >> when you and i were voting from the state department it was 40 million, 50 million. i think cronkite alone probably had about 20 million people. that certainly is true. >> the responsibilities of journalism to democracy and to our society i want you to talk about a lot more. i want you to explain to me why there is this connection between the flow of news and a vibrant society. >> if the american public were voting is ignorant of the issues, is on informed how can make intelligent decisions about who to pick? it's bad enough that the citizens united decision of the supreme
get to meet him? i saw him on david letterman last night and wondered if he was available. love you, on my way to work, mom. anyway, he's darn cute, darn cute. is he available, love mom. going to work. is she looking for somebody for you? >> of course, she is. always on the look. >> i wonder if she could find men the way she finds dresses. men, not so much. >>> we have to give a good shout out to jill rapaport. >> she was honored over the weekend. >> received an aspca service award. >> she's the real deal about animals. >> gets a lot of animals adopted into loving families. >> absolutely her life's work. we're proud of her. >>> a show getting a lot of buzz called "the baby wait." >>> and what's happening in hollywood? andy cohen dishes on everything from rihanna's love life to the bond, james bond. [ female announcer ] with swiffer dusters, a great clean doesn't have to take longer. i'm done. i'm gonna read one of these. i'm gonna read one of these! [ female announcer ] unlike sprays and dust rags, swiffer 360 duster's extender gets into hard-to-reach places without the hassle. so y
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)